10 Fall Political Releases to Get Excited About

It’s hard to keep up with all of the books coming out any given week, let alone season, but it seems like this fall is an even crazier publication season than could otherwise be expected. Maybe it’s because it’s the midterm elections, and maybe because a lot of people are gearing up for a 2020 presidential run, but there are a ton of new political releases coming out this fall that are already getting buzz. Some are from big names like Ben Sasse and Michelle Obama while others are from media personalities like Tucker Carlson. Some are biographies of Supreme Court justices or looks at our fractured democracy, but all of them are sure to hit the spot for a burgeoning politico. Add them to your wishlist now and binge read them as soon as they hit sheles this fall!

Them: Why We Hate Each Other—And How to Heal by Ben Sasse

Something is wrong. We all know it. American life expectancy is declining for a third straight year. Birth rates are dropping. Nearly half of us think the other political party isn’t just wrong; they’re evil. We’re the richest country in history, but we’ve never been more pessimistic. What’s causing the despair? In Them, bestselling author and U.S. Senator Ben Sasse argues that, contrary to conventional wisdom, our crisis isn’t really about politics. It’s that we’re so lonely we can’t see straight—and it bubbles out as anger.
Trump: The Blue-Collar President by Anthony Scaramucci

TRUMP, THE BLUE-COLLAR PRESIDENT is the comeback story for America and Americans. Both Wall Street and Main Street are now thriving and will continue to do so under our current president and his economic policies. Scaramucci shares his insights and stories from his long-term relationship with President Trump.

Where You Go: Life Lessons from My Father by Charlotte Pence

 Through stories intimately illustrating our vice president’s character as a devoted family man, Christian, and public servant, Charlotte Pence both honors her father and shares how his wisdom has impacted her life.Charlotte offers the most important lessons she has learned by her father’s example of love, loyalty, and faith, and through the challenges and triumphs she has shared with her family, some of which are fascinatingly specific to those in politics.She recounts the incredible moments of hope and adversity her family experienced during 100 days on the Trump-Pence campaign trail, the touching times she helped her dad prepare for debates, and why she always knew that their journey would be victorious.With thoughtful and vivid insights, Charlotte pays tribute to Mike Pence, the dreamer who encourages her to be the same, and gives a unique glimpse into their life, which will uplift and inspire.

Ship of Fools: How a Selfish Ruling Class is Bringing America to the Brink of Revolution by Tucker Carlson

The host of Fox News Channel’s Tucker Carlson Tonight offers a blistering critique of the new American ruling class, the elites of both parties, who have taken over the ship of state, leaving the rest of us, the citizen-passengers, to wonder: How do we put the country back on course?

Becoming: A Memoir by Michelle Obama

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African-American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare. 

The Coddling of the American Mind by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt

First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: what doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths are incompatible with basic psychological principles, as well as ancient wisdom from many cultures. They interfere with healthy development. Anyone who embraces these untruths—and the resulting culture of safetyism—is less likely to become an autonomous adult able to navigate the bumpy road of life. 

Contempt: A Memoir of the Clinton Investigation by Ken Starr

You could fill a library with books about the scandals of the Clinton administration, which eventually led to Bill Clinton’s impeachment by the House and acquittal by the Senate. Bill and Hillary Clinton have told the story from their perspectives, as have journalists, pundits, and various participants. But over the last two decades, former Independent Counsel Ken Starr — the prosecutor at the center of the storm — has kept silent. Now Starr finally shares his unique perspective on the investigation that began with the Whitewater land deal and spread to a wide range of President Clinton’s actions, including accusations of sexual harassment and perjury in the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Starr’s narrative includes behind-the-scenes details that have never before emerged, as well as a new analysis from the perspective of history.

John Marshall: the Man Who Made the Supreme Court by Richard Brookhiser

In 1801, a genial and brilliant Revolutionary War veteran and politician became the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. He would hold the post for 34 years (still a record), expounding the Constitution he loved. Before he joined the Court, it was the weakling of the federal government, lacking in dignity and clout. After he died, it could never be ignored again. Through three decades of dramatic cases involving businessmen, scoundrels, Native Americans, and slaves, Marshall defended the federal government against unruly states, established the Supreme Court’s right to rebuke Congress or the president, and unleashed the power of American commerce. For better and for worse, he made the Supreme Court a pillar of American life.

Addicted to Outrage: How Thinking Like A Recovering Addict Can Heal the Country by Glenn Beck

With a nod to a traditional twelve-step program, each chapter encourages self-reflection and growth and shows us the way to a more hopeful, happy future. Beck draws from his own life experiences and includes relevant examples for each step, from families who learned to forgive killers to remembering to believe in something greater than ourselves to understanding the importance of humility. Addicted to Outrage is a timely and necessary guide for how Americans, right and left, must change to survive.

The Reagans: Portrait of a Marriage by Anne Edwards

He was an actor, newly divorced, whose controversial tenure as president of the Screen Actors Guild was drawing more attention than his fading film career. She was a contract player at MGM, unmarried and rapidly growing too old to play the starlet. It was time, she decided, to settle down and become Mrs. Somebody Important. So Nancy Davis contrived an introduction to Ronald Reagan, and the Reagans march into history began. The Reagans: Portrait of a Marriage is a penetrating portrayal of one of the most powerful couples of the twentieth century. Distinguished biographer Anne Edwards paints the first in-depth, intimate portrait of the man who became our fortieth president and the woman without whom he might never have reached such heights.

 

One Comment Add yours

  1. I had no idea Ken Starr was writing a memoir, THAT sounds interesting! Great list.

    Like

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